top of page

Glass Half Empty: The risks and opportunities of water scarcity

In addition to these newer developments, there are many older technologies that are being revitalized, such as desalination, which continues to grow despite criticisms of its expense (costing about twice as much as the treatment of rainwater or waste water). “Desalination is not new, but it is becoming much more efficient,” says Tisdale. Or, if focusing on reuse isn’t your dream, you could simply follow in these expert’s footsteps. You could start an NGO that helps a region gain access to clean water like Cincotta, you could work in Big Data and create strategies for other companies to improve their water efficiency like Tisdale, or you could invest in other people’s water saving ideas like Jones. Who should you work for? There are a multitude of companies working on various water solutions. Some of these companies include: Cambrian Innovation, which has developed a treatment system that leverages electrically active microbes to extract resources like clean water and clean energy from wastewater. FloDesign Sonics, which has created an efficient separation technology that can help clean the water that surfaces when gas and oil is extracted. FloDesign’s technology uses acoustic waves to capture and separate substances from water or other liquids without using filters or chemicals. Desalitech Reflex, which has created a more efficient reverse osmosis system that maximizes energy savings during desalination. And others such as: Oasys, Gradiant, Fathom, Pentair, Danaher, GE Water, Honeywell, and many more. Not looking to work directly with water? You’ll still be affected by water challenges even if opportunities in these companies don’t interest you. There will always be vital decisions related to water use in your future company. “HBS's greatest impact on water challenges will be through the decision making power of its graduates. One aspect of those decisions will be in making and leading behavioral culture,” says Rizzo. “HBS can set a strong example of a sustainable culture by implementing water reduction technologies and practices like low flow faucets and water recycling, such that HBS students get used to using the technology here. This would result in lower use on campus and wider adoption long term as students graduate and advocate for implementation of the technologies and practices they became familiar with at HBS.” Final words of advice: There is no way that water will not impact your career, so the important question is, “what are you going to do about it?” Brittany Harris is a Master's Candidate, studying Environmental Applied Science. She has a background in journalism and is passionate about improving communication between environmental scientists, the media, and the public.

In addition to these newer developments, there are many older technologies that are being revitalized, such as desalination, which continues to grow despite criticisms of its expense (costing about twice as much as the treatment of rainwater or waste water). “Desalination is not new, but it is becoming much more efficient,” says Tisdale. Or, if focusing on reuse isn’t your dream, you could simply follow in these expert’s footsteps. You could start an NGO that helps a region gain access to clean water like Cincotta, you could work in Big Data and create strategies for other companies to improve their water efficiency like Tisdale, or you could invest in other people’s water saving ideas like Jones. Who should you work for? There are a multitude of companies working on various water solutions. Some of these companies include: Cambrian Innovation, which has developed a treatment system that leverages electrically active microbes to extract resources like clean water and clean energy from wastewater. FloDesign Sonics, which has created an efficient separation technology that can help clean the water that surfaces when gas and oil is extracted. FloDesign’s technology uses acoustic waves to capture and separate substances from water or other liquids without using filters or chemicals. Desalitech Reflex, which has created a more efficient reverse osmosis system that maximizes energy savings during desalination. And others such as: Oasys, Gradiant, Fathom, Pentair, Danaher, GE Water, Honeywell, and many more. Not looking to work directly with water? You’ll still be affected by water challenges even if opportunities in these companies don’t interest you. There will always be vital decisions related to water use in your future company. “HBS's greatest impact on water challenges will be through the decision making power of its graduates. One aspect of those decisions will be in making and leading behavioral culture,” says Rizzo. “HBS can set a strong example of a sustainable culture by implementing water reduction technologies and practices like low flow faucets and water recycling, such that HBS students get used to using the technology here. This would result in lower use on campus and wider adoption long term as students graduate and advocate for implementation of the technologies and practices they became familiar with at HBS.” Final words of advice: There is no way that water will not impact your career, so the important question is, “what are you going to do about it?” Brittany Harris is a Master's Candidate, studying Environmental Applied Science. She has a background in journalism and is passionate about improving communication between environmental scientists, the media, and the public.

In addition to these newer developments, there are many older technologies that are being revitalized, such as desalination, which continues to grow despite criticisms of its expense (costing about twice as much as the treatment of rainwater or waste water). “Desalination is not new, but it is becoming much more efficient,” says Tisdale. Or, if focusing on reuse isn’t your dream, you could simply follow in these expert’s footsteps. You could start an NGO that helps a region gain access to clean water like Cincotta, you could work in Big Data and create strategies for other companies to improve their water efficiency like Tisdale, or you could invest in other people’s water saving ideas like Jones. Who should you work for? There are a multitude of companies working on various water solutions. Some of these companies include: Cambrian Innovation, which has developed a treatment system that leverages electrically active microbes to extract resources like clean water and clean energy from wastewater. FloDesign Sonics, which has created an efficient separation technology that can help clean the water that surfaces when gas and oil is extracted. FloDesign’s technology uses acoustic waves to capture and separate substances from water or other liquids without using filters or chemicals. Desalitech Reflex, which has created a more efficient reverse osmosis system that maximizes energy savings during desalination. And others such as: Oasys, Gradiant, Fathom, Pentair, Danaher, GE Water, Honeywell, and many more. Not looking to work directly with water? You’ll still be affected by water challenges even if opportunities in these companies don’t interest you. There will always be vital decisions related to water use in your future company. “HBS's greatest impact on water challenges will be through the decision making power of its graduates. One aspect of those decisions will be in making and leading behavioral culture,” says Rizzo. “HBS can set a strong example of a sustainable culture by implementing water reduction technologies and practices like low flow faucets and water recycling, such that HBS students get used to using the technology here. This would result in lower use on campus and wider adoption long term as students graduate and advocate for implementation of the technologies and practices they became familiar with at HBS.” Final words of advice: There is no way that water will not impact your career, so the important question is, “what are you going to do about it?” Brittany Harris is a Master's Candidate, studying Environmental Applied Science. She has a background in journalism and is passionate about improving communication between environmental scientists, the media, and the public.

In addition to these newer developments, there are many older technologies that are being revitalized, such as desalination, which continues to grow despite criticisms of its expense (costing about twice as much as the treatment of rainwater or waste water). “Desalination is not new, but it is becoming much more efficient,” says Tisdale. Or, if focusing on reuse isn’t your dream, you could simply follow in these expert’s footsteps. You could start an NGO that helps a region gain access to clean water like Cincotta, you could work in Big Data and create strategies for other companies to improve their water efficiency like Tisdale, or you could invest in other people’s water saving ideas like Jones. Who should you work for? There are a multitude of companies working on various water solutions. Some of these companies include: Cambrian Innovation, which has developed a treatment system that leverages electrically active microbes to extract resources like clean water and clean energy from wastewater. FloDesign Sonics, which has created an efficient separation technology that can help clean the water that surfaces when gas and oil is extracted. FloDesign’s technology uses acoustic waves to capture and separate substances from water or other liquids without using filters or chemicals. Desalitech Reflex, which has created a more efficient reverse osmosis system that maximizes energy savings during desalination. And others such as: Oasys, Gradiant, Fathom, Pentair, Danaher, GE Water, Honeywell, and many more. Not looking to work directly with water? You’ll still be affected by water challenges even if opportunities in these companies don’t interest you. There will always be vital decisions related to water use in your future company. “HBS's greatest impact on water challenges will be through the decision making power of its graduates. One aspect of those decisions will be in making and leading behavioral culture,” says Rizzo. “HBS can set a strong example of a sustainable culture by implementing water reduction technologies and practices like low flow faucets and water recycling, such that HBS students get used to using the technology here. This would result in lower use on campus and wider adoption long term as students graduate and advocate for implementation of the technologies and practices they became familiar with at HBS.” Final words of advice: There is no way that water will not impact your career, so the important question is, “what are you going to do about it?” Brittany Harris is a Master's Candidate, studying Environmental Applied Science. She has a background in journalism and is passionate about improving communication between environmental scientists, the media, and the public.

In addition to these newer developments, there are many older technologies that are being revitalized, such as desalination, which continues to grow despite criticisms of its expense (costing about twice as much as the treatment of rainwater or waste water). “Desalination is not new, but it is becoming much more efficient,” says Tisdale. Or, if focusing on reuse isn’t your dream, you could simply follow in these expert’s footsteps. You could start an NGO that helps a region gain access to clean water like Cincotta, you could work in Big Data and create strategies for other companies to improve their water efficiency like Tisdale, or you could invest in other people’s water saving ideas like Jones. Who should you work for? There are a multitude of companies working on various water solutions. Some of these companies include: Cambrian Innovation, which has developed a treatment system that leverages electrically active microbes to extract resources like clean water and clean energy from wastewater. FloDesign Sonics, which has created an efficient separation technology that can help clean the water that surfaces when gas and oil is extracted. FloDesign’s technology uses acoustic waves to capture and separate substances from water or other liquids without using filters or chemicals. Desalitech Reflex, which has created a more efficient reverse osmosis system that maximizes energy savings during desalination. And others such as: Oasys, Gradiant, Fathom, Pentair, Danaher, GE Water, Honeywell, and many more. Not looking to work directly with water? You’ll still be affected by water challenges even if opportunities in these companies don’t interest you. There will always be vital decisions related to water use in your future company. “HBS's greatest impact on water challenges will be through the decision making power of its graduates. One aspect of those decisions will be in making and leading behavioral culture,” says Rizzo. “HBS can set a strong example of a sustainable culture by implementing water reduction technologies and practices like low flow faucets and water recycling, such that HBS students get used to using the technology here. This would result in lower use on campus and wider adoption long term as students graduate and advocate for implementation of the technologies and practices they became familiar with at HBS.” Final words of advice: There is no way that water will not impact your career, so the important question is, “what are you going to do about it?” Brittany Harris is a Master's Candidate, studying Environmental Applied Science. She has a background in journalism and is passionate about improving communication between environmental scientists, the media, and the public.







Established in 1937, The Harbus News Corporation is the independent student news publisher of Harvard Business School.

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page